1909: Water Supply at Helmside and Natland Terrace


District Council Meetings – South Westmorland Rural

At the meeting of this council, held at Kendal on Saturday, Mr. A. Fulton presided.

– With regard to the water supply at Helmside and Natland Terrace, Dr. Cockill reported that the cottages at Helmside were 25 in number, and were supplied from a single pump to the north side of the buildings. Seven of them were situated at a distance of more than 200 feet from the pump. Each cottage has a soft water galvanised iron cistern of about 125 gallons capacity, which was filled from the rain water off the roofs. That, when full, allowed from 14 to 25 gallons of water per head according to the average population of the cottages. At a low computation that was not more than a three days supply in dry weather. All additional water had to be carried beside the usual daily amount for drinking and culinary purposes. The pump water appeared on the whole to be good, though at times there was a good deal of rusty deposit, due probably to the pipes in connection with the pump. That supply had only once been known to fail. He was of opinion the cottages mentioned, which formed 28 per cent of the houses erected there, were supplied with a sufficient supply of water within a reasonable distance. At Natland Terrace the houses were supplied from a single pump. The water was good and had never been known to fail. The houses were all within a reasonable distance of the source of supply. He was of opinion no objection could be taken to that supply. It was decided to press the Railway Company to make a more adequate supply.

Westmorland Gazette, Saturday 13 March 1909

1909: Death of Mrs. Nelson

Much regret was felt in the village on Saturday when it became known that Mrs. Nelson, the wife of Mr. Isaac Newton, of Helmside, had passed away, after undergoing an operation at the new County Hospital at Kendal. Mrs. Nelson was 51 years of age, and had lived at Oxenholme for the last 25 years. The interment took place at Natland on Tuesday, and was attended by a large body of relatives and friends. A staff of railwaymen acted as bearers, and in church the choir sang “Now the labourer’s task is o’er” and “O God our help in ages past.” The service, which was of impressive character, was conducted by the vicar, the Rev. E. J. Miller. Wreaths were sent by the Oxenholme railway staff, the Oxenholme mothers’ meeting, and by many sympathising relatives and friends. The funeral arrangements were carried out by Messrs. Hayes and Parkinson.

Westmorland Gazette, Saturday 13 February 1909

Note: Mrs. Nelson was Mrs. Charlotte Nelson nee Taylor

1906: Presentation

Mr Henry Preston, the new night stationmaster at Holyhead has been presented with a gold watch and chain, and gold studs and sleeve links, by the staff of Oxenholme Junction and some friends. A case of pipes was also presented to him by the telegraph department at the same station.

Carnarvon and Denbigh Herald , 12 January 1906

1901: Presentation at Tebay

A very interesting ceremony took place at the Cross Keys Hotel, Tebay, on Saturday evening, when Mr. James Taberner, late locomotive foreman at Tebay and Oxenholme, who was recently transferred to a similar position at Manchester, attended to receive a handsome marble timepiece, together with a pipe and case and pouch, which had been subscribed for as a mark of esteem by his fellow workmen and a few outside friends. The timepiece bore the following inscription: “Presented to Mr. J. Taberner on his promotion to Ordsall Lane, as a mark of esteem by friends and L. & N. W. Ry. Employees at Tebay and Oxenholme steam sheds.” There was a very good attendance, presided over by Mr. Tideswell, permanent way inspector. Mr. R. Robinson, in the absence of Mr. Beech, chief clerk, made the presentation, which was suitably acknowledged by Mr. Taberner. Excellent relations had always existed between himself and the workmen of Tebay and Oxenholme, and he had left them with the kindliest of feelings. Mr. C. T. Brockbank spoke on the progress of railways, &c., and shewed the great improvements which had been made in the railway system during the past twenty years. Messrs. W. Lindsay and W. Fackerley also spoke.

Penrith Observer, 14 May 1901

1890: Porter killed at Oxenholme Junction

Another of those shocking accidents, which have during the past few years been numerous at Oxenholme Junction, occurred on Thursday evening. The unfortunate man was named William Langhorn, he was 25 years of age, and lived at Helmside, leaving a widow and three children to mourn his loss. The circumstances are very simple and are easily told. It appears that about 7-40 p.m., Langhorn was engaged in shunting operations at the north side of the station, near to the signal box, when he became caught between a horse box and a railway carriage. He was very much crushed, and expired almost immediately. Mr. Moffatt, station-master, and the foreman porter (Armitage) both witnessed the sad affair, which was quite an accident. The body was removed to one of the waiting-rooms to await an inquest.

Westmorland Gazette, 18 October 1890

1890: Shocking accident at the Oxenholme railway station

On the evening of New Year’s Day a terrible accident happened at Oxenholme Railway Station to John Pears, the foreman porter, causing his death. The deceased was married but had no family, and resided at Helmside, a row of cottages a little south of the railway station. When coming on duty about six o’clock it would appear that the deceased crossed the line, and was run into by the London express and literally cut to pieces. The deceased was a steady, quiet man, and much respected by his fellow workmen and the travelling public. An inquest was held on the body on Thursday evening by Mr. F. W. Watson, deputy coroner, when the following evidence was adduced:-

Sarah Pears, of Helmside, deposed: I am the widow of John Pears, the deceased. I last saw him alive last evening, about twenty minutes to six o’clock. My husband was foreman porter at Oxenholme Railway Station. He was due on duty at six o’clock. Before leaving home he was in his usual health and spirits. I had not the slightest reason to think that deceased contemplated any rash act. I am quite satisfied on this point. I attribute his death purely to accident. The deceased was 42 last March.

Henry Paine, brakesman, living at 8, Black Hall Yard, Kendal, deposed: I am in the employ of the London and North-Western Railway Company . I have known the deceased, John Pears, since I commenced work at Oxenholme nine years ago. He was a sober, steady man, and thoroughly acquainted with his duties. When I was coming off duty last evening, about six o’clock, I crossed the shunting yard to get to the platform. I walked along the six-foot way. When near Oxenholme Station I found a can and basket; the can had the deceased’s name stamped upon it. The evening was rather foggy and wet. I suspected that an accident had happened. On proceeding to search a little further south I found a human foot lying on the up loop line, on the shunting side. I then came to the office and told the station master what I had found. The station master and I proceeded back to the place, where we found the trunk of the deceased’s body lying in the four foot of the up main line. The trunk was mangled into a heap. Another person found some other portions of the body further south. I could not identify John Pears from his clothing, nor from any portion of the body that had been found. I cannot account for how the deceased got on to the line. The remains were found about forty yards from the southern end of the platform. I am not aware that the deceased had any duty which required him to cross the rails, but it is commonly done by the railway officials instead of using the sub way.

Thomas Moffat, station master at Oxenholme deposed: I have known the deceased, John Pears, nine years. He was a steady, trustworthy official, and acted as foreman porter. The deceased was due on duty at six o’clock last evening. I did not see him come on duty. A few minutes after six o’clock, the last witness came and reported to me the finding of the can and basket and a human foot. We returned together to continue the search. I corroborate what Paine has said as to the result of the search. Deceased might have been crossing the rails in the ordinary course of his duty. He had continually to do this when on duty. The London express is due to pass Oxenholme at 5-33 p.m., not stopping. Last night the express was late, passing through the station at 5-49. It was proceeding at a high rate of speed. I have no doubt the deceased was killed by that train. It is quite probable that he would think the express had passed and that the line was clear. By a juryman: A lamp underneath the bridge was not lighted; it was moonlight. There was no fog at the time. The platform lamps were all lighted. The lights from the signal box gives a good light where the remains were found. I could identify the deceased by the clothing and can.

Thomas Rumney, of Crewe, deposed: I am an engine-driver, and was in charge of the London express las evening due to pass through Oxenholme at 5-33. I passed through at 5-50. I neither saw, heard or felt anything in passing through Oxenholme, which we did at a rate of about 45 miles an hour. We ran through to Preston without a stop, and on arriving there I found portions of brains scattered against the side frame of the engine. I also observed the peak of a railway cap on the smoke box on the same side. The right buffer lamp was missing when we arrived at Preston. The lamp would be 4ft. or 5ft. from the ground, and this might probably cause death of deceased. The evening was a little hazy, but not so bad at Oxenholme as it was about Hayfell.

Inspector Shepherd, of Lancaster, here stated that there was another train on the down line being shunted when the express went through Oxenholme.

The Deputy-Coroner, however, did not think it was necessary to encumber the dispositions with this.

The jury returned a verdict of “Accidental death.”

Westmorland Gazette, 4 January 1890

1889: Application to take over road

WESTMORLAND COUNTY COUNCIL

The quarterly meeting of this body was held on Wednesday, at the Town Hall, Kendal. The Chairman, Mr. James Cropper, presided, and there was a large attendance of members.

– An application was made by the promoters and subscribers of a road adjoining Oxenholme Junction with Helmside cottages to take over the road as a main road. A generally favourable view was expressed as to the convenience of the new road, but as the preliminary steps had not been taken the matter was allowed to stand over. – The main roads committee stated that an arrangement had been come to with the Kendal Corporation that the latter should be paid at the rate of £120 per mile for the maintenance of about two miles of road in the borough. –Mr. W. H. Wakefield opposed the confirmation of this on the ground that it was excessive, pointing out that the contribution should be in proportion to the wear and tear caused by traffic to the railway station from outsiders. –The Mayor of Kendal (Ald. Baron) contended that Kendal was receiving too little instead of too much, referred to the committee as being the most penurious in the matter. Kendal last year contributed £3,141 to the rates of the county, and did not get back half. They only wanted what was fair, and would be satisfied with no less. –The minutes of the committee were confirmed, there being only two dissentients (Mr. W. H. Wakefield and Mr. W. Wakefield).

Lancaster Gazette, 28 September 1889

1887: Struggle on an engine

A serious affair has just occurred between an engine-driver and fireman on one of the passenger trains running on the loop line between Oxenholme and Windermere. A dispute took place with regard to the work, and the driver, pouncing upon the fireman, gripped him savagely by the throat and knocked him down. The driver then produced a pocket knife, but owing to the greater strength of the fireman, his purpose was averted. On reaching the first station, Staveley, the fireman acquainted the station-master and guard of what had taken place, and at Oxenholme he left the engine and proceeded to a doctor to have his injuries attended to. The fireman’s neck was much injured, the wind-pipe being affected. An inquiry was held by the officials of the London and North-Western Railway Company at Oxenholme, with the result that the driver was dismissed the services of the company.

Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald 20 August 1887