1853: The Queen at Oxenholme Station

The disappointment which was felt by the lieges of Kendal, when the Queen did not stop at Oxenholme on her journey to her Highland Home, was amply compensated yesterday, by the opportunity which was afforded them to testify their loyalty, on her return to Buckingham Palace.

The intelligence reached Kendal on Monday evening that it was intended that the royal train should stop for a few minutes at that station to take in water, and every preparation was forthwith made to do fitting honor, such as the time and occasion required.

The Mayor convened a meeting of the Corporation, and it was resolved that the body should be in attendance to pay their respects to royalty.

The preparations at the station were altogether under the management of the Lancaster and Carlisle Railway Company, to whose line the station belongs, and they appear to have been made with much judgment and ability. Platforms were erected on the up-line of the station, to which admission was given by ticket and though the space was ample, it was by no means sufficient for the numbers that presented themselves. Each member of the Corporation had a ticket for himself, and also one for two ladies; and the other tickets were entrusted to gentlemen, directors and otherwise connected with the Lancaster and Carlisle Railway, for distribution.

The down-side of the station, to which access was free to all comers, was also crowded with spectators; and the tops of the carriages which brought up the throng, and which remained on the line to take them back again were also covered with spectators, whose point of view was by no means the worst.

There was a numerous body of police in attendance, but the order that was observed was, upon the whole, admirable, and redounded greatly to the credit of the people. A special train was in waiting for the Mayor and Corporation of Kendal, which left the Kendal Station shortly after eleven o’clock, and on its arrival at Oxenholme, the municipal body took their appointed station, where they were joined by the High Sheriff, and Mr Ald. Thompson, M.P. for the County.

The royal train, contrary to its wonted punctuality, was nearly 20 minutes behind time. Its arrival was anxiously waited for, and on its drawing up at the watering spot, a burst of enthusiastic cheering took place, with a waving of handkerchiefs, hats &c., which must have convinced her majesty and her escort that the sentiment of loyalty glows as ardently in the bosoms of the people of Kendal, as it does in the bosoms of the denizens of any other of her towns.

The train staid not more than five minutes, but a very good opportunity was afforded for a sight of the Queen. The only drawback was from the reflection of the glass windows, which acted more as a mirror for reflecting the features of the spectators, than to enable them to gain a distinct glimpse of the royal travellers.

Thusfar, however, we were enabled to note, that in the royal saloon carriage were the Queen and her Consort, together with the Prince of Wales and the Princess Royal. Her Majesty, who bowed repeatedly in gracious acknowledgment to the acclamations sent forth from both sides of the station, looked remarkably well. She had on a Paisley tartan plaid shawl, and a bonnet with tartan ribbons. The Prince also most affably acknowledged the greetings with which he was received.

The Mayor and the Corporation were ranged alongside the carriage, and it was expected that her Majesty would have interchanged a few words of courtesy with his Worship. But, as we understand, the Duke of Newcastle, the Lord in Waiting, was precluded, by the prescribed etiquette, from introducing either the Mayor or the High Sheriff, from the circumstance that no previous arrangement had been made for such a ceremony.

The requisite supply of water having been taken in, the train was again put in motion, and slowly left the station, amid the united plaudits of the assembled throng. It is computed that between two and three thousand persons were present, and hardly had the carriages disappeared from view, then they were on their return home.

At two o’clock, on the invitation of the Mayor, a number of gentlemen met together at the Commercial Inn, to lunch. The party comprised about 30 guests, including the members of the corporation. The Mayor was supported on his right and left hand by Mr Hilton Halhead, of Liverpool; the Rev. W. Chaplin, the curate of the parish church; Lieut. Stuart, Dr Proudfoot, Rev. J.W, Black, master of the grammar school, Mr. Cropper, Mr. J.J. Wilson, &c. Mr R. Wilson acted as vice-chairman. After the company had done justice to the repast which was set before them, and which was highly creditable to the purveyor, Mr Barrow, whether as regards the elegance of its details or its more substantial requisites. The cloth was drawn, and the Mayor gave a few appropriate toasts. In proposing the health of The Queen, he alluded with much gracefulness to the visit which she had that day paid, and expressed a hope that she might be induced, at some future time, to pass through the town on her way to the Lakes. We have not space, on the eve of our going to press, to enumerate the different toast which were proposed, but we must take the opportunity of putting before our readers the announcement made by the Mayor of the offer of Mr Hilton Halhead to replace the great East window in the Parish Church, with stained glass. This window he proposed to make partly a memorial window to his father; but in case the Vicar should object, the matter would be left altogether in his hands, The party broke up about five o’clock, and the day will be long remembered in Kendal.

We have only to add that the weather was “the Queen’s own.” Had the day been bespoken for the occasion, it could not have been more propitious. The next stoppage was to be at Preston, where preparations were made for the royal reception on a very grand scale,

Kendal Mercury, Saturday 15 October 1853